Tag Archives: satellite

Artes5.2 ITAR free extended temperature sunsensor project final review

Johan Leijtens - fine sun sensor BiSon74-ET-RH (ITAR free, extended temperature)After 1.5 years of intensive development and testing we formally came to conclusion of the Artes 5.2 project ITAR free extended temperature sunsensor today by performing a final presentation.

Based on inputs gathered from several potential suppliers over the years, the project started as a company internal project some 3 years ago. The main problem these sensors are intended to solve is that for satellites with extendable solar panels, the panels are often blocking part of the sunsensors field of view in the stowed configuration.

Today (06/02/2017) we started advertising on the ISIS cubesatshop.

fine sun sensor - BiSon64-B with a baffle for reduced albedo sensitivityThe main products marketed on the cubesatshop are the BiSon64-B and the BiSon64. Next to this it is also possible to find data on the dedicated pigtails that can be obtained through Lens R&D as well as the special transport container the cap of which can also be used as a remove before flight item.

It has taken quite some time before we decided to go and advertise as we wanted to make sure that we can deliver on the SCOTS promise. This promise is to deliver only top quality components for an off the shelf price and really off the shelf. Currently at TRL8 (a step which most cubesat hardware has skipped by going for a launch before full testing is completed) the first flight is planned for November 2017.

an error during test to your advantage

Everybody knows the Monopoly card  “a failure of the bank to your advantage, you receive…..”

An error that occurred during the vibration testing of our BiSon74-ET-RH sensors feels a bit like that.

Although the sensors were programmed to be tested to very significant levels (1g^2/Hz totalling 38.9g) it has now been confirmed that there was an error in the piloting channel that led to much higher test levels (as can be seen in the accompanying graph.

This plot (taken by the control accelerometer in Y axis) shows an integrated level of 58.77g and a spectral density which is more like 2g^2/Hz.

Although we would never have asked for such high levels of testing ourselves, it feels like an advantage to have done so, knowing that the sensors have survived.